The Future of Economics Isn’t So Dismal (nor boring)

” … economists have been acting a lot like intellectual imperialists in the last decade or so. They have been using their tools — mainly the analysis of enormous piles of data to tease out cause and effect — to examine everything from politics to French wine vintages.
– NYT article “The Future of Economics Isn’t So Dismal” – [via Steven Levitt]

The Economists and Their Research [via NYT]

The Economists’ Web Sites [via NYT]

Ulrike Malmendier: http://www.econ.berkeley.edu/~ulrike/index.html

Stefano DellaVigna: http://elsa.berkeley.edu/~sdellavi/

Roland Fryer: http://www.economics.harvard.edu/faculty/fryer/fryer.html

Jesse Rothstein: http://www.princeton.edu/~jrothst/

Jesse Shapiro: http://home.uchicago.edu/~jmshapir/

Emily Oster: http://home.uchicago.edu/~eoster/

Amy Finkelstein: http://www.nber.org/~afinkels/

Benjamin Olken: http://www.nber.org/~bolken/

Raj Chetty: http://elsa.berkeley.edu/~chetty/

Justin Wolfers: http://bpp.wharton.upenn.edu/jwolfers/index.shtml

Xavier Gabiax: http://econ-www.mit.edu/faculty/index.htm?prof_id=xgabaix

Matthew Gentzkow: http://faculty.chicagogsb.edu/matthew.gentzkow/

Dean Karlan: http://www.econ.yale.edu/karlan/

Advertisements

One Response to The Future of Economics Isn’t So Dismal (nor boring)

  1. […] Also from TED –  Emily Oster, a Becker Fellow at U. of Chicago, will also speak. And I am interested to see. See this Esquire article and Oster’s website for more of her ideas. [via Freakonomics] See also a previous blog entry. […]

%d bloggers like this: