Implications of Anti-Japan fury in China – Wallace & Kempton English Talk

Wednesday, 3 October, 2012

Implications of Anti-Japan fury in China – Wallace & Kempton English Talk


News re Ai Weiwei and his followers’ mass nudity protest

Friday, 25 November, 2011

* Nov 29, Guardian, “Chinese police question Ai Weiwei’s wife – Lu Qing released after three hours of questioning, according to the artist and activist

* Nov 29, Telegraph, “Chinese police question Ai Weiwei’s wife – The wife of Ai Weiwei, the Chinese artist and dissident, was taken in for almost three hours of questioning by police in Beijing on Tuesday and warned her not to leave the city.

* Nov 26, Guardian, “Ai Weiwei: ‘Every day I think, this will be the day I get taken in again…’The more he is harassed by his government, the more Ai Weiwei becomes a symbol of activism in China. But how much longer can he continue to speak out?

* Nov 26, Taipei Times, “Ma defends Chinese artist Ai Weiwei

“President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) yesterday called for China to respect human rights and defended Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei’s (艾未未) right to freedom of expression as he attended an exhibition of Ai’s work at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum.”

* Nov 25, Seattle PI “Taiwan leader calls for artistic freedom in China

“The distance between Taiwan and China will be determined by their views on human rights protection,” Ma [Taiwan President] said. “When our views get closer, the two sides will move closer.”

* Nov 23, Media Bistro, “Ai Weiwei’s Assistant Investigated for Pornography, Internet Supporters Go Nude (or Nearly) in Show of Solidarity

* Nov 22, MSNBC, “Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei answers reader questions

Q: How did you react to the love shown by your supporters who raised money to help you with your legal issues with the government? Were you at all surprise, and how did those who oppose you respond to this kind of support?

Ai Weiwei: I was deeply impressed, firstly surprised by the reaction of the people who openly support me, who was accused by the state with tax fault. This never happened in a nation like china where the authority is the law. And people really can express their feeling against the accusations. With my unique condition, because I have been working with internet for the past few years, and created a space where the oldest power structure seems much less powerful. So people used the money as a voting ticket to express their feelings against authorities, which was trying to manipulate judicial system, and to punish someone who have different opinions, or even a simple expression which reflects certain kind of freedom. In less than 10 days with restriction that my name can not even be recognized on Chinese internet, we got support over 9 million yuan(about 1.4 million dollars), and that not only came as a surprise to me, but a surprise o the whole society and the authorities as well. That would become a symbolic event which really announced a kind of people’s power from Internet.

[...]

Q: I didn’t think you were allowed to talk to the press after being released from prison, what’s changed?

Ai Weiwei: I’m not talking to press. I’m talking to people.

[...]

Q: Do you believe that you can beat the tax evasion charges?

Ai Weiwei: In current conditions I don’t think we can change the outcome of tax evasion investigation because we don’t have independent judicial system. We don’t even have independent tax department. Chinese media, tax bureau, and the court, they are all under one party’s control. There’s no miracle about it. But at the same time, we already won the trial outside the trial. People openly discuss it and support me. It’s already a victory. It will also be a reminder to the powers that they should never use justice as a means for revenge, otherwise that would really hurt themselves, and put the nation in a shadow when there’s no trust in justice.

* Nov 22, MSNBC, “The story behind the chat with Ai Weiwei

* Nov 22, WaPo, “Ai Weiwei rallies his followers in protests

* Nov 21, 2011 Guardian, “Ai Weiwei supporters strip off as artist faces ‘porn’ investigation

* Nov 21, Telegraph, “Ai Weiwei’s followers’ mass nudity protest” (uncensored nude photo)

* Nov 21, HuffPost, “Ai Weiwei Supporters Tweet Naked Photos

*******

WARNING THIS SITE CONTAINS FULL FRONTAL NUDE IMAGES:

艾未粉果 Ai Wei Fans’ Nudity – Listen Chinese Government: Nudity is NOT Pornography

I like this one “@yanglicai: 同光同罪”. In rough English translation, “if nudity is breaking the law, I am breaking the same law, sentence me the same way”)


Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei held incommunicado for 43 days, allowed to see wife for 20 minutes – Ai in ‘good physical health but mentally conflicted’

Monday, 16 May, 2011

The following are some news of Chinees artist Ai Weiwei after he was held incommunicado for 43 days where his family and lawyer have no idea of his whereabout.

To give you some context about “criminal justice in China”, I took time to first post the entries “Criminal Justice In China: An Empirical Inquiry” (an entry about a research study 16 years in the making) and a BBC Chinese report & more “獨立調查:中國沒有司法公正” (machine translated to “Independent Study: There is no justice in China”).

* AP, “Wife of detained Chinese artist finds him tense

“Red-eyed and tense, the usually uninhibited and irreverent Chinese artist Ai Weiwei seemed a different man in custody as he sat for what his wife says was a brief, monitored meeting — his first contact with the outside world in 43 days.

Authorities have still not detailed why the avant-garde artist and government critic was detained April 3 and held incommunicado, in a case that has prompted an outcry in the art world and among U.S. and EU officials, who have called it a sign of China’s deteriorating human rights.

The burly, bearded 53-year-old appeared conflicted and his eyes were puffy when his wife Lu Qing was allowed to visit him Sunday, though he seemed healthy, Lu told The Associated Press.

“He has changed. His mood and demeanor are so different from the simple and spontaneous Ai Weiwei I know,” Lu said Monday. “It was obvious that without freedom to express himself he was not behaving naturally even with me.”

Lu said she sat face to face with her husband during the meeting in a room at an unknown location and that they were watched by someone “who seemed to be in charge of Ai,” and another who took notes. Ai repeatedly assured her he was physically OK: “My health is good. I am fine, don’t worry.””

* UK Telegraph, “Ai Weiwei limbo shines a light into the shadows of China’s police state

* UK Telegraph, “Ai Weiwei allowed to see family – The controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been granted his first family visit 43 days, appearing stressed but otherwise in good health, his wife has said.

* UK Guardian, “Ai Weiwei in ‘good physical health but mentally conflicted’

* For those that are not too familiar of Ai’s work, BBC has a good video “Celebrating the artwork of Ai Weiwei


1001 Chairs for Ai Weiwei

Monday, 18 April, 2011

Toronto Star report, “1001 Chairs for Ai Weiwei, Toronto version” (Facebook photos)

Torontoist, “Scene: Where is Ai Weiwei?

Protest pictures, details and comments posted onto the worldwide 1001 Chairs for Ai Weiwei Facebook group. Pix from New York City here, herehere. Pix from Munich here.

NPR, “Art And Consequence: A Talk With China’s Controversial Ai Weiwei

This Sunday, at Chinese embassies all over the world, protesters are planning a global sit-in to protest the detention of the internationally renowned Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Ai was taken into custody by Chinese authorities nearly two weeks ago for what government officials now say are questions about his finances.

The protesters will be bringing chairs to sit on. They aren’t worried about getting tired. The design of the protest is a homage to a piece by Ai that was exhibited in 2007 at Documenta 12, a major arts festival in Kassel, Germany. Read the rest of this entry »


Ai Weiwei still detained, whereabout unknown

Sunday, 17 April, 2011

* Guardian, “Ai Weiwei arrest protests at Chinese embassies worldwide – Inspired by artist’s installation with 1001 Qing dynasty seats, curator suggests taking chairs into street in silent protest

“Demonstrators all over the world were sitting outside Chinese embassies on Sunday demanding the release of the detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei.

Hundreds of protestors brought chairs onto the street tocall for the immediate release of Ai, and in support of the rights of all Chinese artists.

In Hong Kong there were scuffles as 150 protestors came up against lines of police, with reports of at least one detention. In Berlin, about 200 people took part in a largely silent protest. There was also a gathering outside the Chinese embassy in London.”

* Al Jazeera, “Protest in Hong Kong over Ai Weiwei detention

* CBC News, “Ai Weiwei: latest casualty of China’s crackdown on dissent – Q&A with Alison Klayman, a Beijing-based filmmaker who made a film about the Chinese artist

You have spent a lot of time with Ai Weiwei over the last couple of years, during which time he has been increasingly publicly critical of the Chinese regime. Could you describe the issues about which he has been most vocal?

Ai’s denunciation of the Olympic Games and the Olympic stadium as the “false smile” of an authoritarian regime shed light on Weiwei’s activism in China, but the issue that he was most vocal about — and where he inserted himself into the Chinese conscience — was his citizen’s investigation into the deaths of more than 5,000 schoolchildren in poorly constructed schools during the May 2008 earthquake in Sichuan. Over his Twitter feed, Ai solicited over 70 volunteers to independently record the names, ages, classrooms and villages of the dead. Read the rest of this entry »


Meet Wen Tao, Missing Along with Ai Weiwei on April 3, 2011

Wednesday, 13 April, 2011

Documentary filmmaker Alison Klayman has an insightful piece in Huffington Post, “Meet Wen Tao, Missing Along with Ai Weiwei“. Here is her video putting a face to Wen Tao.


China’s human rights crackdown – interactive guide to “soft detention”, “disappeared” and “missing”

Wednesday, 13 April, 2011

China’s human rights crackdown – interactive guide, UK Guardian

“Chinese authorities have made their biggest move against dissidents and activists for years, including artist Ai Weiwei. The crackdown followed an anonymous online call for protests inspired by Middle Eastern uprisings, although it is unclear if any of those held or missing were connected to the appeal. Information is from human rights groups and inquiries by the Guardian”


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